Books

The God of Small Things

The God of Small ThingsThe God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Don’t judge a book by its cover, is certainly not a quote for this one. It has the prettiest cover I ever saw. And the writing is equally captivating. The plot is set around Rahel-Estha, the two-egg twins, their mother and the god of loss. From the very beginning, you will be wondering what can go wrong with these simple characters with so ordinary lives and by the end when you can imagine the possibilities, you will start wishing not to happen that. Arundhati Roy may have broken quite a few “norms” of society in her story but she has well-weaved the story of Paradise Pickles and Preserves, Airport Fairy, the Boy in Pointed shoes and well-portrayed the bond between two dizygotic twins, the twins and the Sophie Mol & a woman and the God of Small Things.

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Kafka and the Doll: The Pervasiveness of Loss

Franz Kafka, the story goes, encountered a little girl in the park where he went walking daily. She was crying. She had lost her doll and was desolate.

Kafka offered to help her look for the doll and arranged to meet her the next day at the same spot. Unable to find the doll he composed a letter from the doll and read it to her when they met.

“Please do not mourn me, I have gone on a trip to see the world. I will write you of my adventures.” This was the beginning of many letters. When he and the little girl met he read her from these carefully composed letters the imagined adventures of the beloved doll. The little girl was comforted.

When the meetings came to an end Kafka presented her with a doll. She obviously looked different from the original doll. An attached letter explained: “my travels have changed me… “

Many years later, the now grown girl found a letter stuffed into an unnoticed crevice in the cherished replacement doll. In summary it said: “every thing that you love, you will eventually lose, but in the end, love will return in a different form.”

Kafka and the Doll: The Pervasiveness of Loss The healing Story